Seven Tooth Pinion

Thu, 21 Feb 2013

For the next page of the forth coming Gear Zine I need a small drive gear to run against a larger gear. I've decided on a seven tooth gear. The teeth on smaller gears need a more pronounced curved surface than do the teeth on larger gears so I've opted for a gear made from double thickness card where the teeth profiles can be individually cut.


I've gone for the same round pin in a square tube layout as the other gears. The addition of the two green pieces hold the gear square against the axle.


And here's the result. Looking good so far!

Comments (5)

  • Smelter February 22, 2013 at 8:51 am

    Looking like you’ve got the

    Looking like you've got the makings of an epicyclic gearbox there Rob.

    http://www.roymech.co.uk/Useful_Tables/Drive/Epi_cyclic_gears.html

    You might find this on-line calculator useful.

    http://woodgears.ca/gear_cutting/template.html

     

     

    You read my mind 🙂 – RI

    • Smelter February 24, 2013 at 3:40 pm

      Oops, Sorry. Didn’t intend to

      Oops, Sorry. Didn't intend to post a spoiler.

      But then if you will keep posting teasers! 🙂 

      No problem 🙂 Not sure if I can make an annular gear yet.- RI

  • krishnaconsu February 27, 2013 at 11:55 am

    Awesome way of

    Awesome way of designing….

     

    please keep posting such models for students

     

    Marathi Kavita

    • maxlrainer May 19, 2013 at 3:39 pm

      I found an interesting
      I found an interesting implementation of using this gears in a "bookwheel "
      You can find it here:
      http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/

      Please consider "Quelle " at the bottom of the page in english:

      Thanks! Fascinating stuff! – RI

      • Smelter May 19, 2013 at 5:22 pm

        That method is still used in

        That method is still used in rotating jewelry display cases.

        And for pasties. – RI

Comments are closed.