Applied Mesh Gear! This is actually a modified version of the original gear box design. As the handle is turned the boat stays still but the sharks circle menacingly.


The boat needs a fixed point to be glued to. In this project I've added a fixed vertical shaft, the horizontal gear is then connected to a shaft which turns around the fixed shaft.


The disk with the sharks fits onto the lower rotating shaft and the boat is glued to the fixed central shaft.


In this prototype I've used the same gear set as the Mesh Gear mechanism. In the next version I'll be using a larger main gear and a smaller pinion in order to slow down the sharks. They'll look even more menacing if they circle the boat slowly.


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Essential Mechanisms: Mesh Gear.

Turn the handle on the side of the box and the interlocking gear teeth drive the vertical shaft. Make the model as a demonstration of pure mechanism or use it as a starting point for your own character based automata.

Members can download the project for free at the link. Thanks for signing up! Non members can download the parts for £2.50. Once you have downloaded the file, print out the pieces onto thin card. (230 gsm / 67lb) I used coloured card for a colourful model. You can use coloured, white or patterned card. The choice is yours.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the pieces.


Start by making the two gears. They are made from double thickness card. Fold over the pieces and glue them together. Once the glue is dry carefully cut out the teeth.


Make up the crank in three steps.


Fit the nine tooth gear to the crank handle. Line it up with grey line on the handle shaft.


Roll up the two axle tubes and glue down the edges so that they are lined up with the arrow points as shown.


Glue the an axle tube into the handle pushing it completely home.


Glue the short axle tube into the gear, again lining it up with the grey line.


Thread the axle tube into place so that the short axle tube is between the two grey lines.


Fold up the box inner as shown. The end tabs are folded round and glued down to make equilateral triangle tubes. Note that dashed lines are hill folds, dotted lines are valley folds.


Assemble the two short stiffeners and glue them into place on the underside of the box inner as shown. They should be roughly two millimetres from the hole.


Assemble the two box sides. The side tubes are right angled triangles and the end tube is an equilateral triangle.


Fold up and glue down the triangle tube sections on the box top.


Assemble the two box top stiffeners and glue them to the underside of the box. They should be a couple of millimetres from the hole in the box top.


Glue the two box sides to the folded up box inner as shown.


Fold up the box sides and glue them to the box inner as shown. Keep the box centre as square as possible.


Thread the small gear shaft through one side hole in the box inner, through the alignment piece, and out the other side.


Drop the larger gear into place so that it meshes with the other gear.


Complete the mechanism by gluing the box top into place.

As the handle is turned the gears mesh and the vertical shaft is rotated.


The rotation of the vertical shaft can be difficult to see. The hand makes it clearer.

Glue the two halves of the hand together leaving the middle unglued. Slip the completed hand over the vertical shaft.


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Mon 27th Oct 2014

You may have seen this mechanism already in the "notes" sub-website. I thought it would be worth trying to convert the plywood model into card. Turns out it works just as well!

I'm not sure what the mechanism is called, I'm going with meshed gears for now but would appreciate the actual name from anyone in the know.


This works in the same way as a bevel gear but is far simpler to make.


Here's the finished prototype in its rather neat box. Assembly photographs next.


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Sat 25th Oct 2014

New subscriber Jackz sent a comment telling me about how he was taking the Eoraptor model into school for another dinosaur enthusiast student to build with their teacher.

I thought I'd take this moment to post links to the other prehistoric animal related projects that they/you might like to try.

I hope it is useful!


Pterosaur

Turn the crank and the pterosaur flaps his wings and flys.

Triceratops

A quick and easy model to print out and make.

Apatosaurus

Sauropod with flexible head and tail.

T Rex Cam

Program the movements of the T.Rex with interchangeable cams.

Nessie

Is the Lock Ness Monster real, is she, in fact, a plesiosaur? Make the model and find out!

T. Rex

Poseable T.Rex in both mother and child format.

T. Rex Zine

Print out and make this fact fill Zine. Find out all about T. Rexes.

Stegasaurus

A quick and easy to make Stegasaurus. Download and make for free on the Brother International website


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Fri 24th Oct 2014

I had a meeting at Brother International the other day to delver some models. Chatting afterwards, Laura, who had commisioned the models, mentioned that she had seen a Flying Pig model in a film. Unfortunately she couldn't remember which film, only that it was Brazilian.
Faced with the prospect of watching all Brazilian films ever I resigned myself to never knowing.
That was until I received an email from Sarah at Cabaret Mechanical Theatre. She'd seen it too and she knew the film's name!

 


Amazon to the rescue. I must admit that I fast forwarded through the film. I'll go back and watch it properly soon. But there it is! My big screen debut! For anyone who wants to check it, it is at time stamp 20:40

Thank you Laura and Sarah for letting me know!


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Essential Mechanisms: 3:1 reduction gear.

Not just a gear box though! The output gear (the large one in this case) is fitted with a crank so that a push rod can be connected to a character on top of the box. The gear box ratio is actually 10:29. The fact that the teeth numbers don't divide into each other exactly means that it isn't the same teeth meshing against each other all the time. This reduces wear and reduces that chance that teeth snag against each other.


The parts come as a four page file. Members can download them at the link for free. Non members can download them for £2.50.

I printed the parts onto coloured card for a colourful model. You can use white, coloured or patterned card. The best weight is around 230gsm or 67lb thin card.

Score the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the crosshatched areas before carefully cutting out the parts.


The twenty nine tooth gear is made from double thickness card. Fold over the card and glue it down leaving the centre tabs unglued. Once the glue is dry, carefully cut out the gear. You can cut out the holes to make spokes if you choose. They actually make the gear less strong but it does look nicer and it is still plenty strong! Your choice.


Roll up the four axle tubes gluing them down accurately on the edge of the grey area.


Make up the two crank pieces in these two steps.


The push rod ends are made from double thickness card. Fold over the card and glue it down. Once the glue is dry carefully cut out the piece.


Thread one of the crank pieces into the large gear and glue it to the marked area. Use the picture to ensure you have the correct orientation.


Assemble the push rod and push rod ends. Thread the shortest axle tube into place.


Make up the crank and gear assembly as shown fitting the two mid sized axle pieces into place.


Each of the ten small gear teeth is made as shown.


Glue the ten teeth together in a long strip.


Fit the gear inner to the square axle tube as shown.


Glue the gear fillets into place then glue on the second gear end.


Take the tooth strip. Starting at the end with the hanging tab, glue the tooth strip to the tabs on the gear inners.


Assemble the top and the base by folding over the side tabs to make right angled triangles.


Assemble the two box ends. This time the tabs fold round to make equilateral triangles.


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Glue the two ends to the box top. Use the two dots and the three dots on the parts for alignment.


Glue in the base and fold in and glue two of the side pieces. Leave the other two open.


Fit the two gears into place in the box.


Fold in and glue the sides.


Complete the model by gluing on the handle.

Use the model as an exercise in pure mechanism or as the starting point for your own character based automata!


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I'm working on the latest in my Essential Mechanisms series. This time a 3:1 reduction gear.


Rather than just reprising the 2:1 gear I wanted to add a little extra. To that end, the new mechanism includes a crank which can be used to drive your characters.


Here's the gears and crank fitted into a box and ready to go.

I have all the photography and parts layouts done so the finished project should be on the website very shortly.


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Sat 18th Oct 2014

Here's my standard quick-key that I add to the top of model instructions showing what the different line types on the downloads mean. You'll have noticed that I've added a new bit. To the right is a new crosshatched section. This is used to show areas that are to be cut out.


I've made it with a thin grey diagonal cross hatch (50% black 0.25pt line.) Surrounding the crosshatching are a broad white line (light grey in the picture here so you can see it) and closing it all in a 0.5pt black line.


Here's the end result in action on a model part. I think it looks rather good, or as #truelove put it: What? You weren't doing that already?


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Essential Mechanisms: Gearbox.

This gear box features a two to one reduction gearbox. (The gear ratio is actually 23:12 so that the same teeth are not constantly in contact with each other) Use this model as an experiment in pure paper mechanism or as the starting point for your own character based designs.


Print out the parts onto thin card. I used coloured card to make a colourful model. You can use coloured, white, patterned or a mix of all three. Thin card, roughly 230 gsm / 67lb is ideal.

Score along the dotted and dashed lines and cut out the holes before carefully cutting out the pieces.


The teeth of the pinion gear are made individually. Don't worry, there are only twelve! Fold up and glue down each tooth then glue them together in a strip. Make sure that the teeth are just touching at their base.


Twelve teeth glued together.


Glue one of the gear centres to the pinion axle along one of the grey lines.


Glue the two gear fillets into place so that their ends touch the gear centre where the tabs stick out. (arrowed)


Glue the second gear centre into place.


Take the gear strip. Starting from the end with the hanging tab glue the teeth round the central core...


...finishing by gluing the end down to complete the pinion.


Roll up the two paper axles gluing their ends down lined up with the arrows.


Take the longer of the two axle tubes and thread it through the pinion. Line up the grey line with the end of the square tube. (Arrowed)


The larger gear is made of double thickness card. Fold the piece over and glue it down. Make sure that the central tabs are not stuck. Once the glue is dry, cut out the gear. You can cut out the four sector holes if you like although they are purely for decorative purposes.


Fit the gear to the second square tube lining it up with the grey line then fit the white axle tube into place.


The two gears ready for action!


Assemble the handle in three steps.


Making the Box

Make up the two box side. The triangle sections should be right-angled triangles.


Make up the two box ends. This time the triangle sections are equilateral triangles.


Join the two ends to one of the sides. Use the two and three dot makings to ensure the correct arrangement.


Fit the second box side.

Glue in the side flaps from the box ends onto one side only. Make sure that the box stays square.


Fit the gears into place as shown.


Close the box over the axles and glue them down.


Complete the gear box by adding the handle to the pinion gear.

You can use this as a complete model, the gear is a rather satisfying mechanism in its own right. Or you can use the project as the starting point for your own character based design. I'll be adding a couple of examples of what you could do in the near future.


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All the parts layed out and ready for a (roughly) two to one gear box.


I've completed the computer files and taken assembly photographs. I just have the instructions to write.


The finished design will be a reduction gear box as part of my essential mechanisms collection. The plan is that you can use the mechanism as a starting point for your own designs, perhaps by adding a dinosaur as shown below. I'll be producing guides for each mechanism to show how to create your own paper animations as well as producing completed models as examples. Should be fun!


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