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Reciprocating motion

 

This mechanism is used to convert between rotary motion and reciprocating motion. In this mechanism the straight line motion stays at a constant speed throughout the full length of the throw.
 

Comments(26)

Anonymous (not verified)

Do you have a printable model for this?

robives

Not at the moment but it should be possible to adapt the rack and pinion here.

Rob

Anonymous (not verified)

It looks like intermitent motion based on the gear, but it isn't. What is the application?

Anonymous (not verified)

do you have a buildable copy of this

Anonymous (not verified)

Seems to be constant motion along length of travel. Therefore the switch between the slide's movement in one direction and the other would have to be instantaneous?  Is this right?   

robives

Yes, the motion switch is instantaneous. Could be a problem with a real life mechanism, there would be a danger of the teeth snapping off.

Anonymous (not verified)

i am so thankful ii found this

Anonymous (not verified)

can the speed of this model be reduced??????

Anonymous (not verified)

Great work rob, from the chaps of walbottle campus

Anonymous (not verified)

Where did this wonderful mechanism originate?

I'm not sure, does anyone know? - RI

Anonymous (not verified)

Hey guys imrobo nerd and im hoping to create a human like robot what sort of mechanisms could i use for the fingers??? i was thinking of using recipricating mechanisms

Blakymcblack

Try the quick return method found here:

 

http://robives.com/mechanisms/quickreturn

Blakymcblack

Or you could now adapt the New Flip Face mechanism Variant

Anonymous (not verified)

This motion was found in 'Climax' wind engines. The wind turned the pinion and the yoke moved vertically up and down, usually to pump water from wells for cattle in remote places.

Anonymous (not verified)

Thanks a lot 4 the animations Rob; they helped us a lot to fully understand the concepts in mechanisms. Keep up the good work!!!!! From the Form 2C Design & Technology class of 2012 - Selepa Junior Secondary School ; Francistown - Botswana.

You are welcome! I am glad they were helpful - RI

Anonymous (not verified)

this very good i love it 

Anonymous (not verified)

This is EXACTLY what I was looking for! I needed constant left-right motion utilizing only a simple rotary gear, and here it is!

Anonymous (not verified)

i'm confused... why is the example there if it shows linear and rotary when the topic is reciprocating???

 

Reciprocating mean back and forth. You can have reciprocating linear motion as with the blue yoke on this animation - RI

Smelter
Rob uses simple mechanisms to illustrate mechanical principles.
Most reciprocating or linear motions are generated from rotary sources as in Rob's illustration above.
The only true linear motion I've seen in use are electrical linier motors. You can read about them here :- 
Anonymous (not verified)

Thank you so much. This would be absolutely perfect to adapt to a bicycle powered washing machine, which idealy needs to reverse direction so that the water and clothes in the drum sloshes one way then the other but the cyclist just keeps cycling one way. I was looking at all sorts of complicated mechanisms! This is so great.

Anonymous (not verified)

me 2 

wonderful and beautiful 

Anonymous (not verified)

Hi i wouldnt say i know next to anything about mechanisms so this question may seem simple and laughable but i was curious as how one who predict the total linear distance traveled that the mechanism would produce,

is it based on the diametor of the gear driving it or some other factor? ( ie bigger gear more distance )

the distance moved is related to the size of the gear. If the gear were to tune a full turn the distance would be the diameter of the gear times pi. In this example though, the teeth are only around roughly one third of the gear so the distance is the diameter of the gear, times pi, divided by three. - RI

Smelter
Rob
 
I believe "time" is not a factor here :-(
 
"the distance is the diameter of the gear, time pi, divided by three."
 
It would be a bit clearer to write the formula :- Distance = (Diameter x Pi) / 3
Libby

do you have any examples ?


Anonymous (not verified)

This looks similar in concept to #114 on 507 Mechanical Movements (http://507movements.com/mm_114.html)

hugh jazz

piff ting