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Paper Scoring Techniques

Homepage Forums Paper Engineering Paper Scoring Techniques

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #18767

    rossmcsweeney
    Participant

    I was just interested in how everyone scores their paper?

     

    I have tried a few tools so far such as scissors, scoring tool? (Sharp pointy thing for scoring wood I think) a nail and a bone folder point.

     

    Everything works well but when I fold the paper, sometimes the paper seperates at the fold point. So when making models (such as the paper safe) where paper rubs over the corners it gradually pulls the paper away from the score line.

     

    Sorry if this is hard to understand.

     

    Does anyone have any tips for making really nice folded lines, without breaking/tearing/seperating the paper?

     

    Here is a photo of the seperated paper.

     

    http://s33.postimg.org/mdct7u6vz/IMG_2958.jpg

     

    #19368

    paperpino
    Member

    I use an embossing tool. Enter 'embossing tool' in your browser, look at the first few images – a wooden dowl with a wire tipped with a small ball at one end – some may have the 'wire' at both ends. I use one with a not-quite-the-smallest ball. The tool glides smoothly along the edge of my metal ruler and makes an adequate scored line. I use a piece of carboard, as from a cereal box, placed under the sheet of pattern pieces I am scoring. Don't press too hard; you will determine the correct pressure as you progress. It is best to score all the fold lines before you cut out the pieces.

    Other paper modelers may use different tools.

    This is a fun craft and hobby. Happy modeling. 

    #19369

    rossmcsweeney
    Participant

    Thanks for the great tip!

     

    I’ll have a look into an embossing tool! I have also been folding the creases completely flat with the bone folder to make the corners nice and sharp, but I think it’s probably putting too much stress on the paper and seperating. At the moment I am trying to just fold everything nicely at 90 degrees and it seems to be working much better.

     

    But I will check out the embossing tool! Thank you!

     

    #19370

    michael42er
    Participant

    For grooves of fold lines I use a blunt knife tip. Well suited is the tip of an empty ballpen. There must be no cut in the paper.

     

    #19371

    meangirlhg
    Participant

    I also used the tip of dull craft knife blade to score on the paper before folding. When scoring, turn the blade upside down (see the enclosed image) and the blade will compress the line consistently and immediately adjacent to the edge of the ruler. 

    I tried other techniques such as bone folder and tip of ballpoint pen and both tend to leave a distance from the fold line when used with the ruler.

    #19373

    JohnW
    Participant

    I’ve used all these methods, but the tool I keep going back to is the embossing tool. I haven’t found anything better for scoring lines in paper. When I see the paper fibers break down I’ll use a light table and score the underside of the paper on mountain fold lines. But, I haven’t had that problem in a long time. If I’m using single colored paper I normally just use the blade of my X-acto knife and lightly score fold lines. Thank you for the question. If you search the forum I’m sure you’ll get more ideas.

    #19374

    JohnW
    Participant

    As you can see everyone has a different method that works for them which only comes with experience. What may work for one person may not be the best method for another. I’m sure in time you’ll develope your own style and use tools that are best suited for you. Anyway, enjoy this hobby and experiment using the different methods mentioned above.

    Take Care,
    JohnW

    #19375

    JohnW
    Participant

    As you can see everyone has a different method that works for them which only comes with experience. What may work for one person may not be the best method for another. I’m sure in time you’ll develope your own style and use tools that are best suited for you. Anyway, enjoy this hobby and experiment using the different methods mentioned above.

    Take Care,
    JohnW

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